Ben Lawrence

Principal Investigator

Cristin Print

Principal Investigator

Michael Findlay

Principal Investigator

Kate Parker

Programme Manager

Cherie Blenkiron

Senior Research Fellow

Sandra Fitzgerald

PhD Student

Avril Hull

Clinical Nurse Specialist

Tamsin Robb

PhD Student

Pascalene Houseman

Research Technician

Braden Woodhouse

Data Manager Research Tech

Karen Liu

Research Technician

Ana Ramachandran

Research Fellow

Rachna Patel

Research Technician

Vicky Fan

Bioinformatician

Ben Curran

Research Fellow

 

Ben Lawrence

 

Dr Ben Lawrence is a Medical Oncologist who looks after people with gastrointestinal cancers and neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). He trained at the three Auckland Hospitals, the Translational Genomics Institute in Arizona, and Yale University. He co-directs an integrated research and clinical programme called NETwork! with Professor Cris Print as a translational partner. The Network! team undertake multi-level tumour sequencing of NETs looking for predictive biomarkers informed by genomics.

Dr Lawrence is the immediate past-President of the New Zealand Society for Oncology. He collaborates with cancer researchers in Australia, USA, and Europe, and is Principal Investigator on several multinational and collaborative group trials. His clinical and research work explores precision medicine in cancer care.

 

Cristin Print

 

Cris qualified in Medicine from the University of Auckland in 1989 and began research while working as a house surgeon in Dunedin, NZ. He then undertook a PhD in Auckland, followed by a four-year postdoctoral fellowship in the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne, Australia using genetic modification techniques to study development and cell death. He spent six years in Cambridge University, UK, where he was a Fellow of St Edmunds College and developed a deep interest in genomics and bioinformatics. While there he co-founded a bioinformatics biotechnology company that became listed on the Tokyo stock exchange in 2007.

In late 2005 he returned to the University of Auckland where he leads a cross-disciplinary research team of clinicians, biologists, data scientists and statisticians who use genomics, systems biology and bioinformatics to better understand human disease, especially cancer. He leads the Genomics Into Medicine Strategic Research Initiative in Auckland and Chairs the Auckland Regional Tissue Bank Scientific Advisory Board. He is a Director of the NZ Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR) and is Vice President of the Auckland Museum Institute (the Auckland branch of the Royal Society of NZ), a Principle Investigator in the Maurice Wilkins Centre and member of the Science Leadership Team of the ‘Healthier Lives’ National Science Challenge. Previously, he served as President of the NZ Society for Oncology and was Director of the Bioinformatics Institute at the University of Auckland.

 

Michael Findlay

 

Michael Findlay completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Otago. He was awarded his Fellowship of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians in 1990 after training in Wellington and Sydney.

His post-fellowship research in the treatment of gastro-intestinal cancers at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London resulted in the awarding of the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1995. After appointments at Sydney Cancer Centre and Wellington Cancer Centre between 1994 and 2002, he was appointed as the foundation Professor in Oncology at the University of Auckland. With his appointment he established Cancer Trials New Zealand, a clinical trials coordinating centre engaged in the design and conduct of clinical and translational trials in a wide range of cancer types – trials that are considered to be of particular significance to New Zealanders.

Other current activities related to cancer and cancer research include: member of the Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group, Upper GI cancer working party and Scientific Advisory Committee, board member of the Gut Cancer Foundation (previously the Gastrointestinal Cancer Institute) and board member of the Auckland Division of the New Zealand Cancer Society. Michael is an advocate of research-driven cancer care.

 

Kate Parker

 

Kate is project manager of the NETwork! Project and is also responsible for the NET Registry part of the research programme. In addition, Kate is a member of HDEC Northern A Ethics Committee and an Ethics Advisor to Auckland University’s Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Prior to joining the team, Kate was Director of Business Operations, for Proacta, a biotechnology start-up company that focuses on the development of new treatments for oncology that were initially developed at the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre. Kate has also worked with Auckland UniServices, focusing on commercializing technologies invented at the University of Auckland.

Before moving to New Zealand, Kate worked at GlaxoSmithkline in the UK as a member of the Business Projects Team, advising the R&D business on strategic and operational issues. She also spent 5 years at ISO Healthcare consulting (now part of the Monitor Group) and 6 years at CMR International, a not for profit research organization that advises the pharmaceutical industry on issues in international drug development.

She has PhD in drug development from the University of Wales(Cardiff) and an MSc in Clinical Pharmacology from the University of Aberdeen.

 

Cherie Blenkiron

 

Originally from the UK and trained at the Universities of Nottingham, Edinburgh and Cambridge, Cherie arrived in New Zealand in 2009. Her area of interest is in non-protein coding RNAs, regulators of many processes that can be disrupted during the initiation and development of cancers. She joined the NETwork! team in 2012 and has been involved in the unravelling of the molecular biology behind the disease.

 

Sandra Fitzgerald

 

Sandra Fitzgerald is a PhD student, and brings a wealth of experience working previously as a Senior Research Technician on the Neuroendocrine Cancer Project

She completed her Masters of Science at the University of Auckland in Molecular Biology and spent six years working in the Forest Division of Genesis Research and Development Corporation.

After having some time off work to have a family and travel, she moved into breast cancer research, and has subsequently moved into the Neuroendocrine Project.  Our research is predominately using histological and molecular techniques to look at pathological and genomic make up of these tumours.

 

Avril Hull

 

Avril is an Oncology Nurse Specialist focusing on the Neuroendocrine Tumour patient group.

Avril is passionate about working with and for Neuroendocrine patients and is currently works in a number of Neuroendocrine focussed nursing roles. In her work with the NETwork team she is is always looking to recruit new patients to donate tissue and blood to the research. She also works as a Nurse Specialist at ADHB in NETs and also supports the wider New Zealand NET population through her involvement with Unicorn Foundation New Zealand. Over the last 5 years she has worked hard to try support not only patients but nurses from all over New Zealand who are working with NET patients and is responsible for running an annual NETs Nursing workshop.

When Avril is not working she is kept busy with her husband and 2 children!

 

Tamsin Robb

 

Tamsin is currently working towards her PhD investigating genomic heterogeneity and evolution in cancer, supervised by Cherie Blenkiron and Cris Print. She completed a BSc Biomedical Science Honours degree (First Class) under the NETwork! Project in 2015, investigating genomic instability in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, and spent eight months travelling around the world before returning to the NETwork! team as a Research Technician and now PhD student.

 

 

Pascalene Houseman

 

Pascalene has recently completed her MSc in Biotechnology at Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa, where she demonstrated a particular interest in stem cell biology and its potential therapeutic applications. Her thesis was aimed at investigating mitochondrial dynamics and networks in human undifferentiated and differentiated cell lines.

After the completion of her MSc, she arrived in New Zealand in 2017, where she has decided to develop her molecular biology skills further, undertaking the position of research technician for the NETwork! project.

 

Braden Woodhouse

 

Braden is a research technician on the NETwork! Project. He joined the team in 2015 after completing a BSc (Hons) at the University of Auckland in molecular pharmacology. He has worked extensively on the NZ NET registry and continues this involvement alongside technician work in the lab. He is also in a part time operations/business development role at a local business, training in management.

 

Karen Liu

 

Karen has recently joined the NETwork! team as a part-time research technician.
She completed her MSc at the University of Auckland investigating casein-derived peptides on breast carcinoma, where she developed a particular interest in molecular biology.

Subsequently she worked as a research technician at the Liggins Institute and Centre for Brain Research. She also works part-time in the School of Medical Sciences teaching laboratory as a teaching technician.

 

Ana Ramachandran

 

Having done her PhD at the University of Auckland, Ana went on to the University of Oxford and then the Francis Crick Institute and worked on tumour hypoxia and cellular signalling pathways. Her interest is signal transduction pathways that operate in cells for normal homeostasis, with a particular interest on how they affect cell polarity, and understanding how they go wrong in cancer. She is working on pancreatic and small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours in the NETwork! Programme, looking at their genomics and understanding the biology of genetic variants.

 

Rachna Patel

 

Rachna completed her Masters in Health Science at The University of Auckland, studying the impact of diet in protection against gastric cancer.
She recently joined the NETwork! Programme as a Research Technician and will be working on investigating the role of specific genes in cancer and immunology, including local and global genomic profiles of tumours.

Formerly she worked at Genesis Research and Development on their cancer RNAi discovery program in identifying and characterising siRNA based therapeutics. She then joined the Liggins Institute, in their Developmental Programming group, and was involved in studying the effects of altered maternal nutrition on development of offspring in later life. These roles have allowed her to gain a strong knowledge of cellular, molecular and physiological processes as well as enhance her ability to apply several molecular biology and cell culture techniques.

Vicky Fan

Vicky has recently joined the NETwork! team as a full time bioinformatician. She completed her MSc specialising in bioinformatics at the University of Auckland, investigating the genomic and proteomic differences between triplefin fish. Prior to joining the team, she worked with the Bioinformatics Institute and New Zealand Genomics Limited where she took part in many different genomics projects.
She enjoys the challenge of working with a range of data types and applications.

Ben Curran

Ben completed his PhD bioinformatics at The University of Auckland in 2017. He has been developing gene signatures for prostate cancer for diagnostic purposes with Caldera Health since 2016. He is currently working across a number of projects within the NETwork group.

Chris Jackson

Southern DHB

Ole Schmiedel

Auckland DHB

Marianne Elston

Waikato DHB

Richard Isaacs

Mid Central DHB

Dean Harris

Canterbury DHB

Jonathan Koea

Waitemata DHB

Richard Carroll

Capital and Coast DHB

Bridget Robinson

Canterbury DHB

Jeremy Rossaak

Bay of Plenty DHB

 

Chris Jackson

 

Chris Jackson is a Medical Oncologist with special interest in Gastro-intestinal cancers, Lymphoma, Melanoma and Urological Cancers.
He holds a national role in the research and management of Colorectal Cancer.

He graduated from the University of Otago and trained in New Zealand before working at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London – the world’s first specialist cancer hospital.

Positions and Memberships

  • Senior Lecturer at the University of Otago
  • Published author of academic articles and book chapters in Gastrointestinal Cancers and Lymphoma
  • Current Clinical Leader for Oncology Research at Dunedin Hospital
  • Maintains strong links with Cancer Trials within New Zealand
  • Co-founder of Mercy Cancer Care

Chris was born and raised in Otago and is strongly committed to the region. He is a cofounder of Mercy Cancer Care, with Mercy Hospital in 2011 ensuring that patients affected by cancer are offered a full range of systemic treatments that may not otherwise be available.

 

Ole Schmiedel

 

Ole was a Consultant in Diabetes and Endocrinology in the Department of Medicine at Hawke’s Bay Hospital, and he has recently moved to work in Auckland DHB. He trained at the Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany and from 1997 to 2008 he worked in the UK, completing his postgraduate training in Cardiff.

Ole’s main clinical and research interests address the management of diabetes and related complications, lipid disorders and weight problems in patients with diabetes. His expertise covers the whole spectrum of endocrine problems, including thyroid and adrenal problems and neuroendocrine disease.

Ole is a fellow of the Royal College of Australasian Physicians as well as a member of The Obesity Society (USA) and the American Society of Bariatric Physicians.

 

Marianne Elston

 

Marianne Elston, MB ChB, FRACP, PhD, obtained her MBChB with distinction from the University of Otago and completed her Endocrinology training in Auckland and Waikato Hospitals. She then worked in Professor Bruce Robinson’s Cancer Genetics Laboratory at the Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney where she undertook a PhD investigating the molecular basis of pituitary adenomas.  Her interests include the genetics of endocrine neoplasia and thyroid disease. Dr Elston is currently a Consultant Endocrinologist at Waikato Hospital and Senior Lecturer with the University of Auckland.

 

Richard Isaacs

 

Medical Oncologist and Head of Department, Mid Central DHB

Dr Isaacs is currently Vice President of the Palmerston North Medical Research Foundation, and is the recent past Chairman of the Breast Cancer Special Interest Group, a sub-group of the New Zealand Association of Cancer Specialists.  He has been involved in more than 30 medical oncology clinical trials, and has worked extensively with Massey University’s Institute of Molecular Biosciences.

Dr Isaacs is the immediate past Chair of the Advanced Training Committee for Medical Oncology, New Zealand, and is the current Chair of the FRACP Clinical Examinations Committee.

He has published 25 peer reviewed articles.

 

Dean Harris

 

Dean Harris is a Medical Oncologist at Christchurch Hospital.

 

Jonathan Koea

 

Jonathan is a hepatobiliary surgeon and surgical oncologist who works in Auckland, New Zealand. He is a member of the Te Atiawa tribal Iwi and was educated in New Zealand before undertaking fellowships in surgical oncology and hepatobiliary surgery at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre in New York City.

Jonathan has been a member of the Cancer Council of New Zealand, the New Zealand Cancer Registry Advisory Group, a ministerial appointment to the New Zealand Perioperative Mortality Review Committee and is board chair of the Auckland Division of the Cancer Society of New Zealand.

His research interests concentrate on the management of primary and secondary tumours of the liver, gall bladder and bile ducts as well as in service provision for indigenous peoples particularly oncology and related services.

Jonathan is the author of over 150 publications and is a Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery at the University of Auckland School of Medicine, where he is involved in undergraduate and post graduate teaching, as well as a Fellow in Public Health at the University of Otago.

 

Richard Carroll

 

Richard Carroll is an Endocrinologist working in the Endocrine, Diabetes and Research centre at Wellington Regional Hospital.

His specialist clinical interests include neuroendocrine tumours of the pituitary gland and gut, endocrine tumours including familial syndromes, and obesity.  Additionally he runs an endocrine disorders in pregnancy clinic, with a high frequency of thyroid gland disorders.

He is currently undertaking a PhD studying the mechanisms underlying obesity and gut endocrinology, and has active research interests in these fields and in the management of neuroendocrine tumours.

 

Bridget Robinson

 

Professor Bridget Robinson is a Medical Oncologist at Christchurch Hospital and Chair of the Canterbury Comprehensive Cancer Centre, which performs a key role in linking scientists and clinicians managing cancer care. She is also co-director of the MacKenzie Cancer Research Group and Director of the Cancer Society Tissue Bank. She is actively involved in oncology research, with a particular interest in breast and colorectal cancer.

 

Jeremy Rossaak

 

Jeremy is a New Zealand trained General Surgeon with subspecialty interests in gastro-intestinal and pancreatico-biliary surgery.  He is based in Tauranga, and holds a senior lecturer position with Auckland University.

Jeremy specialises in benign and malignant conditions of  the oesophagus, stomach, duodenum, bile ducts, pancreas and gallbladder.

He is an academic surgeon with a strong research background having attained a PhD from the University of Otago in 2005. His current research interests are focussed on the pancreas, faster recovery after surgery, nutrition and direct access surgery.

Mee Ling Yeong

Auckland DHB

Nicole Kramer

Waitematā DHB

Jane Evans

Auckland DHB

Reena Ramsaroop

Waitematā DHB

Masato Yozu

Counties Manukau DHB

Michael Lau

Southern DHB

 

Mee Ling Yeong

 

Mee Ling Yeong trained in pathology in Auckland and Wellington.  She took a special interest in gastroenterology and liver pathology early in her career and had further training in these specialties in the Royal Free and St Mark’s hospitals in London.  Then followed an appointment in Wellington School of Medicine as senior lecturer in pathology where she embarked on research activities in the fields of gastrointestinal and liver pathology.  Prior to that, she was head of the cytology department, Auckland, where she developed fine needle aspiration cytology after returning from a training period in Karolinska Hospital, Stolkholm.

Mee Ling joined Diagnostic Laboratory, Auckland in 1995 where she was subsequently appointed Clinical Director in histology/cytology, a position she holds to 30 September 2014.

In 1998, she was appointed to the position of pathologist to the newly established Liver Transplant Unit after training in King’s College Hospital, London.  Further training in paediatric liver transplant pathology took place in the University of California at Los Angeles.  She held the position until 2012.

Mee Ling has about 40 publications in liver, gastrointestinal and other areas in anatomic pathology.   Her current research activity is as the principal investigator in the Australian-led COMPASS study, which in New Zealand, is a study into the feasibility of HPV as a primary cervical screening test in place of cervical cytology.  Mee Ling has extensive experience in undergraduate and post graduate teaching in pathology.  In recent years, she has participated in many of the activities of the NETwork! Team, which included presentations, lectures in neuroendocrine tumour pathology and was the pathologist who formulated the pathology guidelines for Australasia though COSA.

Her present position is that of Clinical Leader of the newly established Community Anatomic Pathology service, Auckland District Health Board.

 

Nicole Kramer

 

Nicole is a histopathologist at North Shore Hospital in Auckland.

 

Reena Ramsaroop

 

  • Specialist Pathologist, Surgical Pathology Department, Waitemata DHB, Auckland
  • Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit
  • Chair of the NZBCF medical advisory committee

Reena graduated from the University of Natal Medical School as a Fellow of the College of Pathologists (South Africa). She then practiced as Consultant Pathologist/Senior Lecturer at the Natal Medical School. In 1996, Reena emigrated to New Zealand, practicing at Diagnostic Medlab.

Since her arrival in New Zealand, Reena has completed her Ph.D (2000) and The Australasian College of Pathologist Fellowship. She developed her subspecialty interests in gynaecology, oncology and breast pathology with presentations and publications.

With her particular interests in women’s health and research, Reena was for many years the lead Pathologist for Breast Screen Limited (Auckland Central) and actively pursued research projects in women’s health.  She was a member of the BreastScreen Advisory Group, an active member of the Auckland Breast Cancer Study Group and was president of the NZ Society of Cytology.  Reena was appointed a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit in the 2013 New Year Honours in recognition of her services as a histocytopathologist.

 

Masato Yozu

 

Dr Masato Yozu is a Consultant in Anatomical Pathology at Middlemore Hospital (Auckland, New Zealand).

He received his Diploma and Bachelor of Medicine degree (Igakushi) at Jikei University School of Medicine (Tokyo, Japan) in 2003 and his Ph.D. (Dr.Med.Sci) from Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine (Tokyo, Japan) in 2006.

Masato received the Fellowship of The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (FRCPA) in 2013.

Cristin Print

Principal Investigator

Mik Black

Associate Professor

Peter Tsai

Bioinformatician/PhD Student

Nick Knowlton

Research Fellow

Cristin Print

Cris qualified in Medicine from the University of Auckland in 1989 and began research while working as a house surgeon in Dunedin, NZ. He then undertook a PhD in Auckland, followed by a four-year postdoctoral fellowship in the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne, Australia using genetic modification techniques to study development and cell death. He spent six years in Cambridge University, UK, where he was a Fellow of St Edmunds College and developed a deep interest in genomics and bioinformatics. While there he co-founded a bioinformatics biotechnology company that became listed on the Tokyo stock exchange in 2007.

In late 2005 he returned to the University of Auckland where he leads a cross-disciplinary research team of clinicians, biologists, data scientists and statisticians who use genomics, systems biology and bioinformatics to better understand human disease, especially cancer. He leads the Genomics Into Medicine Strategic Research Initiative in Auckland and Chairs the Auckland Regional Tissue Bank Scientific Advisory Board. He is a Director of the NZ Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR) and is Vice President of the Auckland Museum Institute (the Auckland branch of the Royal Society of NZ), a Principle Investigator in the Maurice Wilkins Centre and member of the Science Leadership Team of the ‘Healthier Lives’ National Science Challenge. Previously, he served as President of the NZ Society for Oncology and was Director of the Bioinformatics Institute at the University of Auckland.

Mik Black

Mik Black is an Associate Professor at the University of Otago. He received a B.Sc.(Hons) in Statistics from the University of Canterbury in 1996, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mathematical Statistics and Statistics in 2000 and 2002 from Purdue University. His research interests include the analysis of data from gene expression microarray experiments, Bayesian statistical methods, and statistical computing.

Peter Tsai

Peter completed his MSc specialising in bioinformatics at The University of Auckland in 2008. He was appointed by the university’s Bioinformatics Institute as a research programmer, focusing on next-generation sequencing data. Peter’s areas of expertise involve genome mapping, variant detection, RNA-sequencing and analysing of environmental metagenomics data.

Nick Knowlton

Research Fellow

Alana Gould

Capital and Coast DHB

Glenys Mahoney

MidCentral DHB

Carol Jarvis

Waikato DHB

Debbie Skinner

Southern DHB

 

Alana Gould

 

Alana is a speciality endocrine nurse, working in the Endocrine, Diabetes & Research Centre at Capital & Coast DHB.  She has been in the role for 3 years and has a particular interest in neuroendocrine tumours, along with thyroid and pituitary diseases. Prior to this role Alana spent 4 years in the same unit as a Diabetes Research Nurse.  She graduated with a  Bachelor of Nursing from Massey University Wellington in 2001 and since then Alana has completed a Masters of Nursing (Clinical) and a Post Graduate Diploma in Clinical Research through Victoria University Wellington (VUW), and has most recently finished a Post Graduate Diploma in Endocrinology through the University of South Wales in Cardiff (UK). She currently lectures part-time on the Clinical Research Diploma at VUW.  Alana is also kept busy with her two daughters – Holly (7) and Felicity (5), and husband Rob, and enjoys running and mountain biking in her spare time.

 

Glenys Mahoney

 

Glenys is Data Manager for the Regional Cancer Treatment Service (RCTS).

Prior to working on the NETwork! Project, Glenys was Data Manager for the PIPER project from Jul 2012 – Jul 2014.  Glenys brings 23 years of oncology experience through her work as a Radiation Therapist in Palmerston North. She has a BSc in Radiation Therapy and is currently studying for a Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Research at Victoria University.

 

Carol Jarvis

 

Carol trained at Waikato Hospital and subsequently worked in a variety of specialties before becoming an Infection Control Nurse.

After 20 years in this role, she moved to a private surgical hospital to work in quality and management before returning to Waikato Hospital in 2012 to work as an Endocrine Nurse in clinic and diagnostic testing. In this role, Carol also runs a clinical trial with the Waikato Regional Diabetes Clinic.

Carol has presented at numerous conferences in New Zealand and overseas (most recently a poster at ENDO2015 in San Diego), taught postgraduate Infection Control, has an interest in computing and research, and recently had a paper published in Clinical Endocrinology. She is about to start further postgraduate studies at the University of Auckland while working towards a CNS position in Endocrinology.

 

Debbie Skinner

 

Debbie has worked as an Enrolled Nurse at Dunedin hospital since 1978 having done her training at Auckland Hospital. After a 3 year break to have her son in 1991, she returned to District Nursing in the Eye Department and other Outpatient areas, alongside working at Ashburn Clinic, a private psychiatric hospital.

Debbie started working at Oncology Outpatients in 1998 and moved to the Oncology Research Unit of Dunedin  Hospital in 2009. She lives 25 kms north of Dunedin at the beautiful beach of Warrington and is a keen gardener with a ½ acre to keep in check!

Auckland Regional Tissue Bank – Te Ira Kāwai

Tissue Bank

Helen Morrin

Christchurch Tissue Bank

 

Auckland Regional Tissue Bank – Te Ira Kāwai

 

ARTB facilities are located at the University of Auckland’s Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences opposite Auckland Hospital in Grafton, as well as at Middlemore and North Shore Hospitals. More information can be found at www.tissuebank.ac.nz.

 

Helen Morrin

 

Helen has been the curator of the Cancer Society Tissue Bank located in Christchurch for the past 15 years. She is currently the International Society Of Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER) Vice Chair of the Science Policy Committee and editorial board member of the journal “Biopreservation and Biobanking”.  She still remains research active being a member of the Mackenzie Cancer Research Group with an interest in colorectal and breast cancer.

John Windsor

Siraj Rajaratnam

Andrew MacCormick

Saxon Connor

Richard Babor

Mike Hulme-Moir

Adam Bartlett

Peter Johnston

 

John Windsor

 

Professor Windsor holds a personal chair in Surgery at the University of Auckland and is Director of Surgical Research and is a consultant surgeon at the Auckland City and Mercy Hospitals.

He founded the Pancreas Research Group, Surgical Skills Centre, HPB/UGI Unit, and the Surgical Research Network which now encompasses the Applied Surgery and Metabolism Laboratory and the Surgical Centre for Outcomes Research and Evaluation. Recently Chair Section of Academic Surgery in the RACS, Secretary General of International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

Recently elected as Fellow American Surgical Association, James IV Association of Surgeons and Royal Society of New Zealand.

 

Siraj Rajaratnam

 

Siraj Rajaratnam is a Colorectal Surgeon at North Shore Hospital, Auckland. He completed medical school and general surgical training in New Zealand and Colorectal fellowships in Cambridge and Oxford, UK, and also at North Shore Hospital.

 

Andrew MacCormick

 

Andrew MacCormick trained in General Surgery in New Zealand, gaining his Fellowship in 2009. He undertook his fellowship in Upper GI surgery at Auckland Hospital and in Sydney, Australia at the Royal North Shore Hospital. He returned to New Zealand at the beginning of 2011 to take up the role of Senior Lecturer in Surgery at the South Auckland Clinical School and Consultant Surgeon at Middlemore Hospital. He works as a Bariatric and Upper GI surgeon.

His academic teaching responsibilities are in the area of medical undergraduate teaching in the Year 3 to 6 programme and also supervision of students attached to South Auckland Clinical School based at Middlemore Hospital, Counties Manukau District Health Board.

He has previously undertaken a PhD in the prioritisation of patients for elective general surgery. Andrew’s ongoing research interests are in clinical decision making including teaching decision making skills to undergraduates and postgraduates. Additionally he has research projects in the areas of ERAS, Health Services Research, Clinical Variation and his clinical interests which include both benign and malignant oesophageal and gastric diseases as well as bariatric surgery.

 

Saxon Connor

 

Saxon Connor is a fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and is an HPB surgeon, based in Canterbury DHB.

 

Richard Babor

 

Richard is a consultant upper gastrointestinal and general surgeon at Counties Manukau DHB.

His interests include surgery for obesity and surgery for a spectrum of upper gastro-intestinal and hepato-biliary malignancies.

 

Mike Hulme-Moir

 

Mike Hulme-Moir is a surgeon specialising in the management of all colorectal disease, particularly laparoscopically. He also specialises in the management of melanoma, including sentinel node biopsy, being a member of the North Shore Hospital Melanoma Unit and being actively involved in melanoma research.

Mike trained in colorectal and upper GI surgery at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Scotland and has also completed further training in laparoscopic colorectal surgery in Australia.

 

Adam Bartlett

 

Adam is a General Surgeon with sub-specialty training in liver, pancreas, biliary and transplant surgery.
After completing his medical degree at the University of Auckland and General Surgery training in New Zealand,

Adam undertook a fellowship in HPB and Transplant Surgery at King’s College, London. He has also spent time at Centre Hepato-Biliaire Paul-Brousse, Paris; Leuven Hospital, Belgium; The Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA and The National Children’s Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Adam is frequently invited to speak at international conferences and regularly attends courses to ensure that he is able to deliver first class care and techniques to patients with a variety of surgical needs. Adam is very passionate about his profession and has dedicated a large part of his life to surgery.

 

Peter Johnston

 

Vernon Harvey

Chair

Maui Hudson

University of Waikato

George Laking

Auckland DHB

Tony Reeve

University of Otago

Richman Wee

University of Otago

 

Vernon Harvey (Chair)

 

Associate Professor Harvey has been a consultant Medical Oncologist at Auckland Hospital since 1984 and in private practice since 1992. He is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Oncology at the University of Auckland Medical School. He trained in medicine at Guy’s Hospital, London and undertook his postgraduate oncology training in Auckland and at St Bartholomew’s Hospital in London.

Vernon’s primary interest is the management of patients with breast cancer. He is a keen supporter of clinical trials and the Principal Investigator of a large number of clinical trials in early and advanced breast cancer and drug development. He has been closely involved with the clinical development of trastuzumab (Herceptin) since the initial pivotal trial in advanced breast cancer in the early/mid 1990s.He is an active member of several international breast cancer co-operative trial groups and is Chairman and Scientific Director of the Auckland Breast Cancer Study Group. He was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM) for services to Medicine, particularly Oncology Research in the 2010 New Years Honours.

Vernon has been involved in several NZ governmental committees related to cancer and is a member of the Cancer Treatment Subcommittee of PHARMAC, the government agency responsible for public funding of medicines within the NZ Health Service.

 

Maui Hudson

 

Maui is from Whakatohea, Ngaruahine and Te Mahurehure and is currently based at the University of Waikato.  He is an interdisciplinary researcher with experience across a diverse range of research areas including traditional medicine, Maori research ethics, Maori economic development, Maori health, and the interface between indigenous knowledge and science.  Maui has been a member of a number of national and institutional ethics committees and was part of the team that developed Te Ara Tika: Guidelines on Maori Research Ethics. He has a Research Developer (Vision Matauranga/Maori Partnerships) role where he provides scientists and researchers with advice to strengthen their projects/proposals around research design, engagement with Maori stakeholders, and cultural/ethical components.  Maui is also a Senior Research Fellow in the Maori and Indigenous Governance Centre at the Faculty of Law where he is the Principal Investigator for a Health Research Council funded project exploring Māori views on Biobanking and Genomic Research.

 

George Laking

 

George grew up in Wellington and studied medicine in Dunedin and Wellington.  He completed his postgraduate work in Britain where he wrote his MD on tumour perfusion and his PhD on the economics of diagnosis.  Since 2007 he has worked as a Medical Oncologist in Auckland, with focus areas of lung cancer and adolescent and young adult oncology.  Alongside his hospital work, George is active as an adviser for PHARMAC (member of PTAC since 2009), in tobacco control (Board Member of the Smokefree Coalition), and advocate for public health response to climate change.  At the University of Auckland George is involved in clinical teaching, and his research collaborators include Prof Merryn Gott (School of Nursing) and Prof Mark McKeage (Clinical Pharmacology).

George’s iwi affiliation is Te Whakatōhea, he is involved in Māori Health as a past Chair of Te ORA (the Māori Medical Practitioners’ Association), and as current Chair of the Māori Health Committee of the RACP.

 

Tony Reeve

 

Emeritus Professor Tony Reeve has over thirty years experience in the applications of gene technology to cancer research and was one of the first scientists in Australasia to apply the recombinant DNA technology to the analysis of human diseases.  His research interests range from the fundamental mechanisms underpinning cancer growth through to translational research.  He was formerly the Director of the Cancer Genetics Laboratory at the University of Otago and the Otago Genomics Facility.  He had a major role in establishing NZ Genomics Ltd, a company that provides genomic services for NZ researchers. He was a co-founder of Pacific Edge Biotechnology Ltd, a director and chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board.  He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of NZ, the inaugural recipient of the Charles Hercus Medal for Health Research, recipient of the University of Otago Distinguished Research Medal, and was awarded an ONZM for services to medical science.

 

Richman Wee

 

Richman is based at the Faculty of Law, University of Otago. He was admitted as a barrister and solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand in 1993.

Richman provides comments and advice on the legal, ethical and policy issues regarding the use of human tissue and personal information for health research, as well as clinical/research initiatives involving genomic studies. He is interested in the consent process and the interpretation and communication of information about genomic sequences in research or clinical care contexts. He is a researcher and has been the project manager for the Law Foundation-sponsored Centre for Law and Policy in Emerging Technologies and the ‘Human Genome Research Project: Law, Ethics and Policy for the Future’ at the University of Otago. He has served as the legal member and chair for the NZ Multi-Region Ethics Committee, appointed by the Minister of Health (2007 – 2011). He is presently undertaking research examining the legal, ethical and policy issues relating to biobanks internationally and for NZ.

Murray Brennan

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre

John McCall

McKenzie Chair in Clinical Science

Sean Grimmond

University of Glasgow

Michael Eccles

University of Otago

 

Murray F. Brennan, MD, FACS

 

Dr. Brennan is a surgeon with special expertise in the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas, endocrine tumors (those that involve the adrenal gland, thyroid gland, parathyroid, and the pancreatic islet cells), and pancreatic and stomach cancers. He was Chairman of the Department of Surgery from 1985 until June 2006.

Dr. Brennan holds the positions of Vice President for International Programs and the Benno C. Schmidt Chair in Clinical Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre in New York, and works closely with a team of radiologists, pathologists, medical oncologists, and radiation oncologists to provide treatments that are individually tailored to each patient. Throughout his career, his clinical and research interests have focused on surgical oncology, endocrinology, metabolism, and nutrition. He has designed and conducted numerous clinical trials, which have produced major findings in the management of patients with soft tissue sarcomas and pancreatic cancer.

 

John McCall

 

Professor John McCall holds the McKenzie Chair in Clinical Science at the University of Otago Department of Surgical Sciences.

 

Sean Grimmond

 

Professor Sean Grimmond holds the Chair of Medical Genomics (Translational Research Centre) at the University of Glasgow.

Prior to taking up this position, he was Director for the Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics where he led research efforts into pancreatic and ovarian cancer as part of the International Cancer Genome Consortium

 

Michael Eccles

 

Professor Eccles heads the Developmental Genetics Group and Pathology at the University of Otago, which aims to identify key developmental mechanisms associated with cancer and differentiation/de-differentiation of cells in human disease.

He has experience with various model systems and approaches to address the above, particularly investigations of kidney cancer, developmental gene families involved in kidney morphogenesis, and the control of gene expression affecting cell fate.

Mike is also the NZICRT Chair in Cancer Pathology.

Papaarangi Reid

University of Auckland

Helen Wihongi

Auckland and Waitemata DHBs

Maui Hudson

University of Waikato

Kimiora Henare

University of Auckland

Siobhan Conroy

Unicorn Foundation

 

Papaarangi Reid

 

Papaarangi is Tumuaki and Head of Department of Māori Health at the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, New Zealand.  She holds science and medical degrees from the University of Auckland and is a specialist in public health medicine. She has tribal affiliations to Te Rarawa in the Far North of Aotearoa and her research interests include analysing disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous citizens as a means of monitoring government commitment to indigenous rights.

 

Helen Wihongi

 

Dr Helen Wihongi (Ngati Porou, Ngapuhi, Te whānau a Apanui, Ngati Hine) is the Waitematā and Auckland DHB Director of Māori Health Research.

Helen completed her doctorate in the Department of Psychology at Waikato University. Her discipline is community psychology with a focus on policy and the impact of policy on health populations, in particular Māori populations.

Helen has a strong research and funding background. She sits on a number of clinical and research committees including the Auckland DHB Clinical Ethical Advisory Group, the Precision Driven Health Care Independent Advisory Group, the international HOPE study mortality review group and the Aotearoa New Zealand variome leadership and advisory roopu.

 

Kimiora Henare

 

Kimiora (Te Aupouri, Te Rarawa) is a University of Auckland-trained cancer research scientist.  He is a Health Research Council-funded Eru Pomare Postdoctoral Fellow based at the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, where he completed his doctorate in biomedical science.

His research is focussed primarily on tumour/cancer biology, with a particular interest in developing new treatments that can harness the immune system to fight cancer. His formal training and grasp of Māori language and tikanga enables him to fulfil important dual scientific and cultural advisory roles on several different biomedical research projects; including NETwork!.

Kimiora is driven towards improving Māori workforce capacity in biomedical sciences, and in fostering culturally safe and productive relationships within this context.

 

Maui Hudson

 

Māui is from Whakatohea, Ngaruahine and Te Mahurehure and is currently based at the University of Waikato. He is an interdisciplinary researcher with experience across a diverse range of research areas including traditional medicine, Māori research ethics, Māori economic development, Māori health, and the interface between indigenous knowledge and science.

Māui has been a member of a number of national and institutional ethics committees and was part of the team that developed Te Ara Tika: Guidelines on Māori Research Ethics, Te Mata Ira Guidelines for Genomic Research with Māori, and He Tangata Kei Tua Guidelines for Biobanking with Māori. He is a foundation member of Te Mana Raraunga Māori Data Sovereignty Network, a co-convener of the Summer Internship for Indigenous Genomics – Aotearoa, and part of the Senior Leadership Team for Genomics Aotearoa.

 

Siobhan Conroy

 

Siobhan is the NZ Founder and Executive Director of the Unicorn Foundation NZ, which she established in 2012. Utilising her background in marketing and business management she has grown it from an idea to the fully fledged organisation it is today.  Siobhan brings a unique understanding of NET cancer as her father died from a genetic form of the disease (MEN Type 1) over 30 years ago which she has also been diagnosed with.

Early on, Siobhan saw the massive need for support and advocacy for NET cancer patients in NZ as previously they have been ‘brushed aside’ as an unknown/difficult cancer. She is determined to help improve NET cancer support, awareness and treatment options now and in the future.

She lives in Auckland and juggles this busy role around her young family.